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To the Editor,

The Four Chaplains of World War II are remembered in February because their ship sank off the coast of Greenland on February 3, 1943. American Legion Post 296 will honor them with a short interfaith ceremony on Tuesday, February 19.

These four U.S. Army Chaplains were on the Dorchester, Troop ship carrying 900 soldiers. When the ship was struck by a torpedo, the four chaplains passed out life jackets until all were gone. Then they took off their own precious jackets, gave them to four young servicemen and told them to jump from the sinking ship.

Clark Poling was a Reformed Church chaplain; Alexander Goode was a Jewish Rabbi, John Washington was Catholic and George Fox was Methodist. These chaplains of different faiths were last seen with their arms linked, praying to the one God they all served as the ship sank into the ocean.

The Chapel of the Four Chaplains in Philadelphia holds interfaith services each week at three altars, one for each faith, Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant. An eternal light burns above the entrance as a sign of unity. And chiseled in stone are these words: "Here is Sanctuary for Brotherhood. Let it Never be Violated."

At 7:30pm on Tuesday, February 19, American Legion Post 296 will welcome the public to join them at this interfaith memorial to the heroism of those chaplains. The ceremony will precede the general meeting, which will be open to all Legion members and guests. Post 296 is on Tillman Road, just west of Calhoun Street.

Signed,

Phil Ader

Vice Commander Post 296 

 

Dear Mr. Stark,

I have lived in Waynedale all my life, and I have many animal friends. There are several cats and dogs that come to see me quite frequently, as well as the wild birds and squirrels that I enjoy feeding. I don't see anything wrong with animals roaming as long as they aren't mean. If they bite, they should be destroyed. I know I'm old fashioned, but I don't believe in caging, chaining, or pinning any animal. I think it's cruel and unnatural. It seems to me that there are far too many laws that restrict animals. The next thing you know, they will want to license and cage the wild animals that come to visit. If those people who have written to you in the last two papers about the roaming boxer, lived in my neighborhood, they would be mad every day of their lives.

Yours truly,

An Animal Lover

 

Editor,

I am responding to the people who wrote to the editor 1/23/02 and 2//6/02 concerning the Mae Julian article about her daughter's dog, named Buddy. I think you guys need to get a life! I really doubt that the dog really mated with a Shetland pony. In fact, I think that would be quite impossible. If you couldn't at least smile at a comment like that, you are taking life way too serious.

I love the Mae Julian column and when you call her sick and uncaring, I wonder about your judgement. I know that people love their pets and they provide the love that is lacking in their life. I'm sure there are countless abused animals in this country to worry about, but I don't believe that Buddy is one of them. She lives with a loving family, and so do the puppies. If anyone is to blame, it is the Vet who told them that Buddy couldn't get pregnant. He is probably the same Vet who refused to treat her when she got in trouble. Unfortunately, not all pet owners know what to do when something goes wrong with their pet, and these people have to depend on the advice of a trained professional. In this case, the Vet who gave the bad advice fell short in his responsibilities. I have re-read the Mae Julian column and found nothing to get upset about. Her columns are always entertaining and uplifting, and that is more than I can say about the letters to the editor in the last two issues.

Sincerely,

MMJ (a Waynedale resident for 49 years)

 

Dear Editor,

I enjoy your paper, and love the Mae Julian column. After reading the Letters To The Editor in the last two papers, I had to go back and read the Mae Julian column from January 9th. Were these people reading the same article that I read? I know people are nuts about their animals, but give me a break! Mae Julian never said that she shot her dog in the garage with a gun. She said she (the dog) ". . . got distemper and was destroyed by a gunshot in our garage." She also states that she loved the dog. Keep in mind that this was probably 50 years ago, and many dogs were destroyed this way. I don't really think that this quick and painless death would be cruel, but I know it isn't a popular idea these days.

Another point that was mentioned was, why the dog had not been spayed. Mae Julian points out quite clearly that the veterinarian said ". . . she would never get pregnant." Why then would you spend the money to get her spayed? I know that animal lovers seem to love to spend money on their animals, but this is ridiculous. Another point that was brought up was, why the dog was left to run the neighborhood. Mae Julian stated that her daughter had both a 7-foot fence and had invested in an electronic invisible fence. Both of these items are very costly, but neither worked. Would it be more humane to let the dog live on the end of a chain like so many dogs do?

It sounds like Betsy and her kids love Buddy and her puppies, and have tried to provide a good home for them. The people who have said that they are sick, cruel and uncaring are clearly out of line. Your articles are great. Keep up the good work, and don't let a few animal fanatics get you down.

Signed,

Lin Smith

 

Dear Sir,

In the days following the terrorist attack of New York City and the Pentagon Building, along with the plane crash in Pennsylvania, it became apparent that God's name was going to be called on by many, many people who already called on him as well as many who probably had forgotten that he really does not have a last name (damn). It was truly uplifting to hear people talk about their faith in God, see school children praying, and to actually see our leaders in prayer and to hear our president citing part of the twenty-third Psalm. If the attack did nothing else, it brought back the urgency of our nation to return to the God fearing and loving country that we once were. My how we have strayed from the foundation that our ancestors laid out for us. Suddenly, in a matter of minutes the separation of church and state no longer existed and we were again ". . . one nation under God."

I wonder how many Americans know that there is a second stanza to our national anthem? I personally would like to hear it sung any time the first stanza is sung because it says even more than ". . . bombs bursting." It goes like this:

And thus be it ever, when free men shall stand between their loved homes and the war's desolation. Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, and this be our motto: IN GOD IS OUR TRUST. Then the Star Spangled Banner in triumph shall wave, o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave."

To the memory of those brave people who lost their lives helping others, as well as the innocent people who were in the buildings and planes, I commend them to God's loving arms and pray that each knew Jesus as their Lord and Savior. To all of us still living and trying to come to terms with these horrendous happenings I say, "Remember the second stanza of our national anthem and especially the IN GOD IS OUR TRUST and we will remain a united and free country. PLEASE, GOD, BLESS AMERICA with an outpouring of your Holy Spirit to see us through whatever lays ahead of us.

(I know that you usually don't print individual letters, so I guess I'll be disappointed if it does not appear in the paper, but at least I have written my feelings, and I hope the feelings of many thousands of Americans whether they reside in the Waynedale area, or anywhere in the USA.)

Sincerely,

Mrs. Joan Klenke – (a Waynedale Resident and proud of it.)


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